Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.
‹Benjamin Franklin›
Atlantis: the domain of the Stingray
25Oct
2015
Sun
15:38
author: Stingray
category: Sermons
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Festival of the Reformation (Transferred)

Matthew 11:12-19

Festival of the Reformation 2015 Wordle
In the name of the Father and of the + Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

It’s what I call the quintessential hymn of the Reformation, even though it was written some 24 years after Luther posted 95 Theses on the Wittenberg church door. It speaks volumes about what the Reformation was all about: The Word of God, God shielding His people from forces opposed to the Gospel, being kept in faith until death, and salvation by grace through faith alone. Today’s translation leaves out some more politically incorrect verbiage, but that does not make Luther’s original any less true, even today. Sadly, many Lutherans push this one aside for an earlier Luther hymn, which is pulled out in all of it’s glory on this day and sung with militant, Lutheran gusto.

18Oct
2015
Sun
15:35
author: Stingray
category: Sermons
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St. Luke, Evangelist

Luke 10:1-9

St. Luke, Evangelist 2015 Wordle
In the name of the Father and of the + Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

On the outset, today’s text appears to be a text for pastors. Or, it might seem as if Jesus is talking to pastors, or men that He is sending out as pastors. The list of things he tells them are words worthy of a pastor to keep in mind as he ministers to God’s people.

  • These men are being sent out as lambs among wolves. Jesus says and does some neat things, but He also has a way of rubbing people the wrong way. It’s not that He’s being mean or mischievous—He’s the Truth, and what He says and does is the truth, and fallen man cannot handle the truth, at least not always. These men are being sent out to proclaim the Word of God, and they can expect to be treated like lambs by wolves. This is a reality for pastors today, too.
  • These men are to bring no provisions with them; instead, they are to expect to be provided for by a “son of peace,” for “the laborer is worthy of his wages.” Where the truth is proclaimed and received by a “son of peace,” the reaction by that son is the support of the proclamation. This is, essentially, the opposite of being treated like a lamb among wolves—this is being treated like the emissary of righteousness, life, and salvation. So, these men will be taken care of by those who receive the Word of God. Likewise, this is the case for pastors, today, too, insofar as the sons of peace today are able in some places.
  • These men are told to heal the sick and say, “The kingdom of God has come near to you.” This is the task for which they are sent. It’s all that they are to do, and it’s simple. The healings will all be by the power of Jesus; the word proclaimed will be nothing more or less than Jesus. For it, they will either be hated to the point of death, or loved to the point of being cared for, esteemed, and revered. Jesus doesn’t ask much of them, though it is a difficult, yet simple, task. The reward, on the other hand, is life for them and for all who would receive them. Once again, pastors today are to do the same thing, administering the medicine of immortality in the Lord’s Supper and proclaiming the great day of the Lord in the words of Holy Absolution.