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Atlantis: the domain of the Stingray
7Jan
2004
Wed
16:51
author: Stingray
category: Hymns
comments: 3
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Geoffrey
4Mar2014/13:17

Catching up, version 2 of this hymn was sung during the Mid-week Lenten services in 2012 at Christ Our Savior Lutheran Church, my parish. The dates were February 29, March 7, March 14, March 21, and March 28.

[174.29.97.221]
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Geoffrey
9Apr2014/22:46

Version 1 of this hymn was sung at the Ash Wednesday and Mid-week Lenten services 2014 at Christ Our Savior Lutheran Church, my parish. The dates were 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, and 4/9.

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Geoffrey
9Mar2015/13:07

Some more catching up: version 1 of this hymn was sung for the mid-week Advent 2014 services at Christ Our Savior – Elizabeth. The dates were 12/3, 12/10, and 12/17.

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Hymn of Light (Phos Hilaron)

various scripture references

I was putting together a liturgical Evening Prayer service—following the designs of what are in Hymnal Supplement 98 (ISBN 0-570-01212-0) and Lutheran Worship (ISBN 0-570-04221-6)—for use during mid-week Lenten services at both of my churches, and I needed a Hymn of Light. Now, my churches have The Lutheran Hymnal (ISBN 0-570-01001-2) in the pews, and there is hymn number 101 (which is a Phos Hilaron), but I knew I could do something different.

I started writing the first version thinking that 8.7.8.7. was Common Meter. I really like what I ended up writing, but as I started looking at Common Meter tunes, I quickly (like with the first tune) realized that I had one too many syllables in the second and fourth phrases. So, I looked for 8.7.8.7. tunes, and there weren't many that worked well with this text; most of them were Trochaic and this hymn is Iambic. Anyway, I found a couple then proceeded to write a Common Meter version of the hymn and found a large number of tunes that worked with it. I have supplied to two best tunes.

I guess these hymns could use a tune of their own. If you know the story of the Phos Hilaron and can write hymn tunes, please take a crack at writing a tune for these hymns. Let me know if you come up with anything, and let me post it!


Version 1 (8.7.8.7.)

  1. O gracious Light, from heav'n and blest,
    Pure brightness of the Father;
    O Jesus Christ, our evening guest,
    The Sun to all here gathered.
  2. As sunlight o'er our land now wanes,
    And vesper lights are burning,
    We sing our praise in glad refrains
    To God—our thanks returning.
  3. O Son of God, giv'n o'er to die,
    Your glory fills creation.
    Your praise is sung to You on high
    By voices in elation. Amen.

Tunes:

Ich dank' dir schon by Michael Prätorius, 1610

St. Columba (an Irish tune)

Version 2 (CM: 8.6.8.6.)

  1. O gracious Light, from heaven poured,
    God's glory manifest,
    O Jesus Christ, most holy Lord,
    Immortal, heav'nly, blest!
  2. As sunlight o'er our land now wanes,
    And vesper lights do burn,
    We lift our praise in glad refrains,
    And thanks to You return.
  3. For praise and thanks to You belong,
    Life-giver, God's own Son;
    Creation sings a joyous song
    To You, the Three-in-One. Amen.

Tunes:

St. Magnus by Jeremiah Clarke, 1709

St. Agnes by John B. Dykes, 1866
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